National 12 - find out more...
 

Non Slip coming off!

Started by Martin, 13 Mar 2006, 11:21

« previous - next »

Martin

Have just acquired an older Winder Feeling Foolish.  The original non slip surface on the floor has worn through in places and is peeling off quite nicely in others.  In other areas it seems quite stable.  Any thoughts on sorting it out?  Is it feasible to use heat gun to remove what remains and if so what is the best thing to use for replacement?

Matt (Guest)

I'd probably resist the easy option of heat gun on glass fibre. You'll find the composite construction burns very nicely. I saw a couple of lasers burned last year ( oikey kids! ). The only thing left was the blocks. everything else turned to carbon dioxide and water.

David_Wilkins

I suggest you give Tom Stewart a call at P&B - I'm sure he'll be able to advise you on the best course of action.

Cheers

David
3481
David Wilkins<br /><br /><br />Ex 925, 2433,2730,2825,3139,3345.3405,3481

Jane Wade

We had the same problem with the Winder foolish we had.  It is a horrid job getting it off but really the only neat and tidy option.  Then replace with the same stuff - which is called progrip and goes on with contact adhesive.

Martin

So is the standard finish on a Winder Foolish Progrip?  I had, maybe incorrectly, assumed Progrip was a tape adhesive. I presumed the stuff on the floor of the boat was some kind of gel coat with a coarse finish to provide a non slip surface.  

DavidW

Progrip is a thin soft rubbery material - don't think its standard Foolish kit. Again I suggest a call to P&B - they would probably know what you've got on your floor, though someone may have added something already. Deck paint seems to work quite well once you,ve cleaned off what you've got on.

Some acetone or perhaps epoxy thinners might attack the remnants that you have.

Have fun
David
3481
David Wilkins
3481 Cooked to Perfection

MR Spy (Guest)

It will be hibuild paint with colloidal silica mixed in. It's pretty easy to do your self, rough the surrounding area with 80 grit paper, mix your paint, hardener and silica (25-30% silica rings a bell) and either stipple the resultant mass on or use a roller (I think Winders use a felt one).

It's far better than interdeck paint, lighter than using sand but quite expensive.

John Meadowcroft

Martin
what number have you bought?
john

Martin


Jane Wade

In which case it is progrip because that is what we put on there when we had it!

Matt (Guest)


Richard Pilgrim

Martin

Have you tried contacting Dave Peacock (from whom you bought the boat)? He might have bimbled with the floor himself - worth a try.

Richard
N3300

Martin

I did speak to Dave when I bought the boat as clearly it has been patched as the stuff was coming off.  I can't remember now exactly what he said he used but it was on the lines of th Hi Build coloidal silica solution mentioned earlier in the thread. This is effective but the colour match isn't great.

I was just really trying to establish if it was a problem common to these boats.  Apart from the floor which is going to need sorting I am very pleased with the boat.  Not sure if I am going to have the time or inclination to do it myself.  A couple of guys at our Club have had their elderly Lasers refurbished by an ex Laser Centre employee who has set up on his own in the locality.  His work seems of a good quality and reasonably priced.  Might have a chat with him.

There is  rubber non slip padding (purple of course!)on the centreboard case capping, which is very effective when roll tacking. Presumably that is progrip?

hmmm (Guest)


John Meadowcroft

I would consider getting a quote from P&B in Northampton.  Call Tom Stewart on 01604 592808.  I would assume that they would consult with Winder prior to proceeding.  Their workshop produces excellent results too and I am sure that they would be pleased to work on a boat which was previously owned by Tom.  Its amazing that this boat is already 9 years old.  It is great to see how long boats stay genuinely 100% competitive at the moment with relatively low maintenance.  Agree with the previous point about gelcoat chips on the early Winder foolishes.  On my one this was restricted only to the thwart and to the centreboard capping and all the problems arose in the first couple of years of ownership and were easily fixed.

However you sort it, do it soon and get out on the water!

good luck
John.

n12 Bottom Banner

  Back to top