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Dangly pole

Started by RichardB2, 27 Jun 2013, 09:36

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RichardB2

Hi,
I have just aquired N12 3126 - a Tigress design. Along with all the gizmos that came with the boat I was handed a pole (I think known as a jib pole?) but haven't a clue how you rig this piece of equipment up? :-/
It is a  circa 1m long hollow tube with a piece of 2mm rope running through it and and a rope stopper on one end and that is about it. Any steer would be much appreciated.
Many thanks in advance.
 
Richard
 

Alex D

Alex <br />(ex N3455, N3246)

RichardB2

Brilliant! Thanks Alex. Will try and make sense of the diagram! R

paul turner

The diagram isn't easy to de-code, is it?
Where are you in the country? I will be helping one of our members at Trent Valley to fit one to his boat in the next week or two (having just fitted dangly to China Doll last week!) - you are welcome to join us to watch and/or have help doing yours.
Paul

RichardB2

Hi Paul,
Thanks for the invite. I am based in the South (Haywards Heath) so sadly won't be able to attend but if some photos could taken and uploaded to the site or emailed that would be really useful.
Thanks again.
Richard
[mail=richardbattey@curriebrown.com]richardbattey@curriebrown.com[/mail]
 

RichardB2

email should be:
 
[mail=richard.battey@curriebrown.com]richard.battey@curriebrown.com[/mail]
Thanks

paul turner

OK will do so after the vintage champs this weekend

RichardB2

Thanks Paul. Much appreciated.

RichardB2

Hi Paul,
Did you manage to take any pictures of the pole set up? Only I am still at a loss to understand the sketch. If you could send something through for a simpleton like me it would be much apprciated.:)
Thanks
 
Richard

Tim Gatti

Richard - not quite 'a thousand words' but haven't got my pictures to hand.....

On the front face of your mast you need to fasten some ss wire or dyneema. 
The top will be fixed a couple of feet below your spreaders, the bottom just above your gooseneck. 
Put a loop on each end of the wire/cord and fasten to mast with deck clips/lacing eyes using rivets or self tapping screws.
It needs to be pulled very tight as the pole runs up and down this line.

Next....

Let into the top cap of the pole (or sometimes fastened onto the pole using deck clips) there should be:

1. A stainless steel ring - usually on a loop of dyneema knotted through the pole cap.  The wire/dyneema on the front face of the mast needs to pass through this ring before it is fastened down.  The ring (and attached pole) can then slide up and down the front of the mast but the pole remains 'captive'.

2. A length of shockcord - to retrieve the pole back up the mast when not being used to pole out the jib.  All shockcords are different - you need to go for a length that gives enough support for the weight of the pole but not so much tension that you need the strength of a gorilla to pull the pole down and then causing the pole to fly up the mast like a crossbow bolt when you release it!

The longer the shockcord the better - one solution is to pivot a small block off the forward face of the mast at spreader height.  Start the shockcord at the base of the mast, run it up and through the block and then down to the top of the pole.

The Rolls-Royce solution is to let a halyard sheave into the face of the mast just above or below the spreaders and run the shockcord up the inside of the mast and out at the sheave.  The advantage of this method is that the shockcord doesn't suffer so much from weathering and UV degradation so that at the end of the season the pole hangs down like a limp... well, I'll leave it to your imagination!

Finally, the pole contol line ... this usually has a ball on the end to fasten it through the cringle on the jib clew - it then runs up though the pole, through a small sheave let into the top of the pole and down to foredeck level with at least another meter or two to enable the crew to take the line with them when they move right aft on a screaming reach - when the pole comes into its own.

The two main cleating systems are:

a) On the foredeck - adjacent to the mast, fasten a good cam cleat with a rear fairlead and just forward of that, a small turning block (often on a spring). The line comes vertically down from the pole top, through the turning block and runs horizontally through the cam cleat and back to the crew. Ensure the cleat is near the aft edge of the foredeck and if possible, aft of the back face of the mast.  That way the crew can operate it from both sides of the boat.  Using this system, you will need to unthread the pole line from the foredeck fittings each time you take your mast off the boat

b) A slightly more expensive option - but one which avoids having to re-thread your line each time you rig/de-rig the mast, is to use one of the excellent swivel jammers now on the market - Holt, Ronstan etc.  These have a sheave and cam cleats integrated into the fitting and can be swivelled through about 90 degrees to make cleating a little easier.  You will need to experiment with the optimum position for it to be screwed or rivetted to the side of your mast just above foredeck level.  Their drawback is that if the crew isn't paying attention - the jib sheet can sometimesget wrapped around it - which can really muck up an otherwise beautifully executed roll-tack!

Hope that helps - have got some pictures which I will try and post after the weekend.

NOTE: All the above refers to aluminium masts - the arrangements for internal shock cord  and swivel jammers might be a little different for carbon masts - carbon mast owners may wish to contribute to this discussion???

Cheers

Tim

RichardB2

Fantastic! Many thanks Tim.
Will give it a whirl this weekend.
Cheers
 
Richard

Chadders

Minor but important point, I think you said that your pole is about a metre long.  A survey on these pages and my own experience shows that the optimum length for the pole is 1.6 metres.  8)

angus

I would agree with Howard that the pole needs to be at least 1.6m.
It is important to get the line that the ring from the pole as tight as possible. I once got a nice hole in my sail from a slack line and over enthusiaastic crew.
I have never found it neccessary to run the control line down the pole. It is much simpler to tie the pole directly to the jib and the control line to top end of the dangley pole. Although if you do it that way it is important not to have your shock cord too tight as it will pull the jib out of shape when you are not using the pole in light winds.
All smoke and Mirrors. N2153, 2969, 3411

Chadders

Angus is quite correct and I have used both methods with equal success, the joy of Twelves is that we all have our ways of doing things so you can often pick and choose your options to suit you.

RichardB2

Thanks guys. Measured pole it is 1.3m? Sounds like I need to find something about 1.6m long.
Cheers
Richard

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